Detailed Calendar

Calendar

This calendar is subject to change as we adjust to the interests and needs of our class. It will be updated weekly with due dates, details, links, and explanations of work to be completed. Check this calendar regularly. Because our calendar will adjust to our needs over the course of the semester, assignments and due dates on this calendar will always be definitive.

End of Semester Assignment Instructions

Scope of Work Proposal Guidelines

Professional Profile overall revision notes

End of Semester In Class Micro Evalution: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1HxHnwSZqbX0rWJ5ZRJeI9R–XXsT0tKUV89JBIpri84/edit?usp=sharing

Week Thirteen—Primary Research/Activity Mapping

Week Fourteen—Interview/Design Decision making

Monday 4/17

  • Final Project Proposal Revisions Due in Google Docs BEFORE class.
  • Visual Design Discussion

Wednesday

  • Small group studio meetings: Document design, active reading, platform choices
  • Status  memos due in class– In class status meetings

Friday

  • Small group studio meetings: Document design, active reading, platform choices
  • Studio– In class status meetings.

Week fifteen—Studio

Monday 4/24

  • Transcription Discussion

Wednesday

  • Studio

Friday

  • Final Project Reports

Week Sixteen—Finals Week

All projects due, in hard copy or digital copy in Google Drive folders by Wednesday May 3rd at 5 PM (But don’t wait ’til the 3rd. Get this stuff off your plate and start your summer. Also, Get them in early to make my end of semester grading easier.)

Week One—Steal Like an Artist

Monday

  • Syllabus
  • Expectations
  • Introduction

Wednesday

  • Read and Discuss: Steal Like an Artist—Austin Kleon (Book) We’ll focus on points 1-5 on Wednesday
  • Read Discussion post for first half of Steal Like an Artist
  • Plan to share your thinking and do some in class writing

Friday

  • Read and Discuss Steal Like an Artist—Austin Kleon (Book)
  • Read Discussion post for second half of Steal Like an Artist
  • In-Class Writing– First Creative Engagement as a group
  • Collect Emails/Usernames for WordPress accounts

Week Two—Heuristic and Rhetorical Frames

Monday

  • MLK day, No Class

Wednesday

  • Read and Discuss:
    • “Understanding Rhetoric”, (PDF on Blackboard) This is a quick dip through classical rhetorical history and also touches on some important aspects of rhetoric I want to cover.  Think about the relationship between ethics and ethos. Also think about kairos. Have you had that experience of saying the right thing at exactly the right time? To what extent is a kairotic moment something you can create?
    • Cannons of Rhetoric at Rhetorica.net Browse this site. Be able to talk about the five cannons of rhetoric. Think about practical application. How have you experienced/used/engaged rhetoric outside the classroom? (I promise, you have, you do, and most likely are as you’re reading this.)

Friday

  • Read and Discuss: “The Rhetorical Situation” by Lloyd Bitzer (Online Journal) Please look for this Article through the Purdue Libraries Online Database. Using our online databases ensures their continued funding (and knowing how to use them effectively for research is an important skill.)
  • Find reading discussion questions here.
  • Weekend Homework: Read the Jenny Edbauer article and this blog post to help guide your reading. Part of your weekend homework is to write a discussion question, so make sure you read this blog post carefully.

    Week Three—Rhetorical Ecology

    Monday

    • Read and Discuss: “Unframing models of public distribution: From rhetorical situation to rhetorical ecologies”—Jenny Edbauer (Online Journal)
    • Find reading help and discussion questions here

    Wednesday

    • Read and Discuss: “Unframing models of public distribution: From rhetorical situation to rhetorical ecologies”—Jenny Edbauer (Online Journal)

    Friday

    • In-Class work WordPress practice posts: Before class on Friday, identify a current example (in the news, in your field, in your communities) that help you think through and apply the idea of rhetorical ecologies. Be prepared to use this example to help you articulate your current, working definition of rhetoric and its relationship to professional writing. Come to class with links, or with sources you want to reference in your post. We’ll work with WordPress to make sure everyone has access and can draft and publish a post.
    • If you’re feeling uncomfortable with WordPress, or it is completely new to you, I recommend browsing the help/tutorials prior to class on Friday.
    • Creative Project assignment sign up
    • Reading Discussion leader sign up

Week Four—Problem Setting

Monday

  • Read and Discuss: “Our Unstable Artistry: Donald Shon’s Counterprofessional Practice of Problem setting”—Jeremy Cushman (Online Journal)
  • Review of memo conventions/expectations.

Wednesday

  • Read and Discuss: “Our Unstable Artistry: Donald Shon’s Counterprofessional Practice of Problem setting”—Jeremy Cushman (Online Journal)
  • Memo #1 due by email end of day Thursday. Please read this assignment sheet about memos and your first memo prompt. Some of the memo deadlines have changed, so make sure you’re keeping up with the calendar.

Friday

  • Creative Project Presentations

Week Five—Ethics

Monday

  • Genre discussion: Memo Design. In class reading/writing  Class Cancelled

Wednesday

  • Read and Discuss: Problems in Technical Communication J. Blake Scott (PDF on Blackboard

Friday

  • Read and Discuss: Katz “Ethics of Expediency” (PDF on Blackboard)

Week Six—Accessibility

Monday

  • Read Introduction to Rhetorical Accessability : At the Intersection of Technical Communication and Disability Studies edited by Lisa Meloncon (available as a an ebook through Purdue Libraries)
  • Skim at least one other chapter that you find interesting given your field. What are the main questions and concerns raised by the authors in this collection?

Wednesday

  • Read Chapter 9, “Web Accessibility Statements: Connecting Professional Writing, Corporate Social Responsibility, and Burkean Rhetoric” in Rhetorical Accessibility : At the Intersection of Technical Communication and Disability Studies  edited by Lisa Meloncon (available as a an ebook through Purdue Libraries)
    • The author is making some arguments about accessibility in relationship to Kenneth Burke’s definitions of rhetoric. See what you can gather about Burke’s rhetoric and accessibility, but I’m more interested in the larger conversation about professional writing, corporate responsibility, and and accessibility statements.
  • Memo #2 Due  Memo #2 Due Date rescheduled for Friday at 1:00 PM

Friday

  • Creative Presentations
  • Memo#2 Due via email before 1:00 PM 

Week Seven—Usability

Monday

  • Read: usability.gov  → “What and Why of Usability”
    • Browse articles here, and read the ones that interest you, but make sure you read: “User Experience Basics”, “User-Centered Design Basics”, “Visual Design Basics”, and “Accessibility Basics”
    • Choose at least two other articles to browse.

Wednesday

Friday

  • Usability testing lab
  • Web accessibility evaluation tool 
  • More accessibility tools/discussion via Allison Hitt’s Blog –Allison Hitt studies and writes about accessibility issues in professional and technical communication. A talk she gave last summer includes some helpful resources including a discussion about the importance of usability and some tools: a site that talks about color/colorblindness, a free screen reading simulator, and a hearing simulator. 
  • Bring to class: An online document or website you want to evaluate for usability/accessibility.

In Class: Memo #3, due next Wednesday March 1st will include a usability analysis and a recommendation report on an existing website or online document. In class today, you will do some rhetorical analysis of a web space and make some decisions about which questions and tools you will use to perform your usability tests over the weekend.

Week Eight—Re-Mix and Re-read

Monday

  • Before class today:
    • Re-Read Blog posts and your own notes.
    • Pull from the readings the definitions or descriptions of rhetoric you think are the most useful. Be prepared to cite them.
    • Identify at least two questions or concepts you want to spend more time thinking about. Bring those notes with you to class.
  • Working Definitions of Rhetoric
  • Collaborative review — develop tasks.
  • Re-Reading Decisions

Wednesday

  • Re-Reading Discussion/Confirm review assignments
  • Collaborative review — develop tasks.
  • Memo #3 Due (Detailed Instructions about memo #3) Due over email by end of day
    • Web accessibility evaluation tool 
    • More accessibility tools/discussion via Allison Hitt’s Blog –Allison Hitt studies and writes about accessibility issues in professional and technical communication. A talk she gave last summer includes some helpful resources including a discussion about the importance of usability and some tools: a site that talks about color/colorblindness, a free screen reading simulator, and a hearing simulation

Friday

  • Memo– peer review survey– 3 people you would like to work with on peer review. Two of them need to be people you don’t regularly collaborate/work/play with.
  • Creative Presentations

Week Nine—Mid term Review/Exam

Monday

  • Review Discussion
  • Mid-Term

Wednesday

  • Memo Peer Review/Discussion
  • Professional Writing Showcase elevator pitch.

Friday

  • Take Home Midterm No class

Spring Break NO CLASS

Week Ten— Mapping the Field/Peer Review

Monday

  • Field Mapping
  • Before class:
    • Find five current job listings for professional writers/technical communicators.
    • Find three jobs that aren’t explicitly PW/TC jobs, for which you think professional writers are qualified.
    • Add jobs to our class Google sheet
  • In class: Fill out all the fields in this spreadsheet for each job.

Wednesday

  • Memo peer review and revision assignment 
  • Bring clean copies of memos #2 and #3 with you to class on Wednesday.
  • Be in class. The work we do will be hard to make up, and will be part of one of your five 30 point memo assignments. 

Friday

  • Creative Presentations
  • Overview of Interview Assignment
  • One page revision plans due to me via email by end of day.

Week Eleven—Mapping the Field/Topsight

Monday 3/27

  • Reading discussion Topsight—Clay Spinuzzi
    • Discussion Group one focus on Chapter 1, and Phase one, Planning a Study (So chapters 2,3,4,5)
    • Focus on:
      • What is Topsight as Spinuzzi defines it
      • How do you develop good research questions
      • What kinds of ethical concerns do you need to consider as you identify a research site?
      • What kinds of rhetorical concerns will you need to think through as you approach research subjects and pitch your research projects?

Wednesday

  • Reading and Discussion: Topsight—Clay Spinuzzi
    • Discussion Group two focus on Chapter one and phase two (Chapters 6-10)
    • Focus on:
      • Chapter One: Continue and clarify discussion of Topsight
        • Primary research methods: observation, interview, artifact collection.
        • Research Design
  • Memo Revisions+reflective cover letter Due IN CLASS Wednesday March 29

Friday

  • Proposal Discussion
  • Brainstorm Research Designs

Week Twelve—Primary Research/Activity Mapping

Monday 4/3

  • Read Chapters 19-20 of Topsight: Developing Activity Systems/Networks

Wednesday

  • In Class work: Activity maps in class
  • Research Design Proposals Due (Drafts) Drafts due in e-mail by end of day. 

Friday

  • Creative Presentations
  • Proposal Feedback and Revision Discussion

Week Thirteen—Primary Research/Activity Mapping

Monday 4/10

  • Proposal Revisions Due
  • Interview/research Preparation

Wednesday

  • Final Project Proposals Due
  • Interview/research Preparation

Friday

  • Visual Design Discussion